Fun and affordable, Japanese snack boxes are popular both as one-off gifts and as ongoing subscriptions for fans of Japanese candy and food, and culture more broadly. There are a number of companies that ship these snack boxes internationally, but here we’ll be focusing on just one—Tokyo Treat.

In this review, we’ll give you an idea of what you can expect in a Tokyo Treat box, how much it costs, and whether it’s the right Japanese snack box for you.

tokyo treat orange box
Photo by Carey Finn

Note: We’ve also popped open a box of artisanal Japanese snacks from Bokksu—you can read our overview for the sake of comparison (and yes, like this one, it is littered with unnecessary photos of cats).

What’s in a Tokyo Treat Japanese snack box?

A Tokyo Treat box contains a mix of Japanese candy and savory snacks. The breakdown depends on whether you pay for a Premium or Classic box. The contents change monthly, but in the Premium box you can generally expect a soft drink, uncommon Kit Kat, anime- or game-themed snacks, dagashi and a bunch of other tasty items.

We sampled the Premium box for the month of January, 2021, and here’s what was in it:

tokyo treat box contents
Photo by Carey Finn

In total, we received 17 different items. It was a balanced combination of sweet and savory, and made tea time that much more enjoyable for a week straight. Included in the box was a “menu”, with information on each of the treats, so you know what you’re eating, and what makes it special.

tokyo treat japanese snack box
Photo by Carey Finn

Though many of the snacks are widely available in Japan, some are less common. For example, despite priding ourselves in our knowledge of unusual Kit Kats in Japan, we had never heard of the ones in this Tokyo Treat box—onsen manjuu flavor. They went great with coffee, and made us want to run off to a hot spring (that’s what an onsen is).

The Classic box contains fewer treats: in our case, it would have missed the Kit Kats, Fanta Premier Peach (which, by the way, is very peachy), and special winter Pocky, among other items. If you can afford it, the Premium box is probably better value.

How much do Tokyo Treat snack boxes cost?

The rates vary according to the type of plan and length of subscription you choose. Shipping is extra.

Premium boxes

Premium snack boxes come in at 35 USD for a one-month subscription (this is good for a trial or once-off gift), and get progressively cheaper the longer you sign up for, as follows:

  • 3 months: 33.50 USD/month
  • 6 months: 32 USD/month (this plan seems to be pretty popular)
  • 1 year: 31.50 USD/month

See the Premium pricing options.

dot in tokyo treat box
Dot inspects the Premium haul. | Photo by Carey Finn

Classic boxes

You get a bit less, and pay a bit less, too:

  • 1 month: 25 USD/month
  • 3 months: 24 USD/month
  • 6 months: 23 USD/month (this plan also seems to be pretty popular)
  • 1 year: 22.50 USD/month

See the Classic pricing options.

enzo sniffing tokyo treat box
Sidekick Enzo sniffs out the best treats. | Photo by Carey Finn

Where does Tokyo Treat ship?

Tokyo Treat’s Japanese snack boxes are shipped internationally via DHL or Japan Post Priority Shipping, or surface mail where these options are not available.

Some of the countries and regions where DHL delivery is available include:

  • Australia and New Zealand
  • Canada
  • United States
  • United Kingdom
  • Bangladesh
  • India
  • Guam
  • Hong Kong
  • Korea
  • Malaysia
  • Singapore
  • Philippines
  • Taiwan
  • Thailand
  • Vietnam

See a full list of shipping destinations.

Shipping with DHL means delivery in about 2-5 days, while it’s around 14-28 days with Priority Shipping. Delivery fees are around 10 USD – 12.50 USD. Surface mail is free but can take 2-3 months, so it’s not really ideal.

dot sniffs poriki snack
Dot inspects a choice snack. | Photo by Carey Finn

Is Tokyo Treat the right Japanese snack box for me?

It’s tough to say which is the best Japanese snack box—there are so many to choose from (there were 15 at one count, maybe more now). But Tokyo Treat is worth trying, in our opinion, and we think the Premium box is especially good value.

If you’re interested in anime, games and Japanese pop culture, then Tokyo Treat holds extra appeal in its perks and partnerships. You can order a monthly “kawaii” Japanese subscription box, beauty box and other goods through partner providers.

Also: Through the good Tokyo Treat people, you can play a live online crane game, too, called Tokyo Catch, where you control a UFO catcher remotely, and can have your plushy prizes shipped to your house. Look for it on the Tokyo Treat website.

dot in tokyo treat box
Photo by Carey Finn

*Note: Actual cats are not included in Japanese snack boxes. You’ll need to adopt them on your own.

We were not paid by Tokyo Treat to write this article. However, we did receive a sample box to review. Additionally, this article contains affiliate links. If you order through them, we will receive some monies to help keep The Laser Cats fed and happy.

Written by:
Carey's Tokyo favorites are: artless craft tea & coffee
Filed under: Eating & Drinking
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