Long associated with bedbugs, noisy neighbors and a budget-traveler vibe, hostels have undergone a redesign, and Tokyo has set the bar high.

About Tokyo luxury hostels

While hostels in Japan are certainly of a higher standard than in many countries, there are still quite a few sketchy examples to be found. In the past few years, however, a new wave of high-end hostels have been poppping up, offering a more luxe option that’s free of bedbugs and more social than a business hotel. While you may still be sharing bathrooms and have to put your precious posessions in a locker, you’ll meet new people and get local tips from hosts.

Most Tokyo luxury hostels often have both dorm and private rooms, as well as more private sleeping spaces (usually capsule style). Design-wise, they fall into two main categories: modern or traditional. Contemporary hostels offer cafes and coworking spaces and have a slightly more high-end feel. Think hanging plants, exposed wood and those reclaimed-looking chairs—it’s a specific hipster-esque vibe, but it’s nice. Alternatively, the traditional options offer a more Japanese design, usually located in older, converted buildings with original features. Whichever you prefer, there’s no need to slum it next time you’re in Tokyo.

If you’re looking for something a bit more unusual, take a look at our picks for the city’s most unique hostels instead or try out a capsule!

Pricing

Note that the prices for the following Tokyo luxury hostels below are likely to vary a bit, but should be a reliable reflection for advance booking prices. As always though, compare a couple of the popular sites as well as the hostel homepage to get the best price.

Editor’s note: Due to the ever-changing COVID-19 situation, hostels are subject to close at anytime.

1. Almond Hostel and Cafe | Shibuya

Just around the corner from Yoyogi-koen Station, this hostel has a minimalist style with a relaxed atmosphere. Offering very private capsule dorms or slightly less private bunks, you can choose between your own bubble or a less claustraphobic option. There’s a simple cafe in the open lounge area and free wifi throughout, so you can get some work done before you head out.

Dorms from: ¥3,000/night
Private rooms from: N/A

Book your stay at Almond Hostel and Cafe.

2. Hotel and Hostel Seven Garden Tokyo | Asakusa

Host of private events, experts at making french toast, and home to stylish common spaces and comfy bunks, this hostel is an unsurprisingly popular spot in Asakusa. There are capsule-style bunks or private rooms, with all the usual perks like free wifi, luggage storage and air-con.

While the quadruple rooms may have you sleeping a little close for comfort with your roommates, they have the that hotel feel you may well be craving after too many nights in a bunk.

Dorms from: ¥3,300
Private rooms from: ¥14,000

Book your stay at Seven Garden.

3. Nui Hostel | Kuramae

A hipster homeland in a converted warehouse, Nui is one of the best-looking hostels in town. Filled with specially made furniture, reclaimed trees, and no doubt plenty of digital nomads, the cafe/bar is a lively spot to meet fellow travelers, work or enjoy breakfast.

Rooms come in a good mix of sizes and price points, with bunks, economy twin rooms, and riverview doubles to choose from. If you like the style but not the location, they also have Citan (details below) and Guesthouse Toca (details in our unique hostels guide).

Dorms from: ¥3,500
Private rooms from: ¥8,400

Book your stay at Nui.

4. Focus Kuramae | Kuramae

One of the hostels with a female-only floor, Focus is one of the most affordable options when it comes to stylish accommodation. The bar/cafe/lounge area is pretty enough to be a stand-alone cafe and has plenty of space to plan your sightseeing itinerary over a coffee. It’s also a great place to meet fellow travelers over a drink from the well-stocked bar with DJs playing in the background.

While the bunks are curtained rather than capsule-style, they’re private enough and comfy too. The private rooms are surprisingly affordable, with singles and doubles on the female-only floor, mixed doubles, and family rooms available.

Dorms from: ¥1,700
Private rooms from: ¥4,400

Book your stay at Focus.

5. Guesthouse Denchi | Nishi-Asakusa

Featuring handmade wooden beds, artwork and traditional noren dividers, this hostel is run by a construction and design studio, lending it a unique style. There’s free coffee and herbal teas, wifi and an impressive amount of plants, following a delicate, nature-led theme.

The dorm bunks are capsule style with personal reading lights, blackout curtains and private lockers. A little cozier than some of the super-trendy ones, here you’ll find illustrations, paintings and quirky decorations to soften the plywood edges, with a distinctly Japanese feel.

Dorms from: ¥2,700
Private rooms from: ¥5,700

Book your stay at Guesthouse Denchi.

6. Citan | Nihonbashi

In the same family as Nui and Guesthouse Toca, this is a trendy hostel and cafe in the up-market but still interesting area of Nihonbashi. Part of the old Shitamachi district of Tokyo, Nihonbashi is home to great festivals, traditional food and a rough-around-the-edges charm as it was once the downtown district of Tokyo.

The hostel is spacious, with its own DJ schedule, a restobar, and a Berth Coffee, which is open to the public, so you’ll get a good mix of people. Room-wise, choose from dorms or privates (twin, Queen doubles or King doubles)—all at surprisingly reasonable prices, especially if you’re doubling up.

Dorms from: ¥2,200
Private rooms from: ¥6,000

Book your stay at Citan.

7. Lyuro Kiyosumi | Asakusa

Right on the river (and with views of Skytree), this hostel is one of the Share Hotel locations, known for their high-quality and stylish design. Offering dorms and private rooms, you can pick from family size, bunk quads, and hotel-style doubles.

There’s a riverside terrace, spacious common rooms, an in-house brewery and a restaurant—all with a minimal but interesting themes. Unfortunately, as this place leans more to the hotel side of things, there’s no kitchen available. But, there is luggage storage and you get your own nightwear, slippers and towels, which is a nice touch.

Dorms from: ¥2,800
Private rooms from: ¥7,000

Book your stay at Lyuro Kiyosumi.

Editor’s note: Article images were provided via Agoda. Featured image by Lily Crossley-Baxter.

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