The Tokyo Summer Fireworks Guide

Mine Serizawa
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Sumidagawa Fireworks Festival (July 28th, Asakusa Station)

tokyo fireworks festival
Photo by Yoichiro Uno used under CC

If you only go to one Tokyo fireworks festival, make it the Sumidagawa Fireworks Festival in Asakusa (from 7:00-8:30 pm). The origin of this particular festival dates back to 1733, so it’s rich with history, tradition…and intense competition between pyrotechnic companies trying to outdo one another.

And what comes with all that is equally intense crowds. Roughly a million people from far and wide come to see the spectacle from just about any vantage point possible—river boats, rooftops or just elbow to elbow in the streets. But don’t let that put you off, the 20,000(!) fireworks lighting up the sky in just about every shape and color imaginable makes up for having to share space! Read our Sumidagawa survival guide for some tips on enjoying the Sumida River Fireworks festival without breaking a sweat or wrecking your wallet.

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 Sumidagawa Fireworks Festival

tokyo fireworks festival
Dates:Late Jul, 2019
Entry:Free

Other Tokyo fireworks festivals to check out

Just because the Sumidagawa Festival is pretty much the mother of Tokyo’s fireworks festivals doesn’t mean that the rest aren’t worth attending as well! These other events also draw huge crowds, but perhaps you’d have better luck finding a prime spot for some of them.

Photo by Marufish used under CC

1. Adachi Fireworks Festival (July 21st, Kita-Senju Station)

Marking its 40th year, the Adachi Fireworks Festival will involve 13,600 rocket-type fireworks blasting off into the night sky. It’ll last for an hour (7:30-8:30 pm) and will take place along the Arakawa River—specifically, near Nishi-Araibashi Park.



 Adachi Fireworks Festival

Dates:Late Jul, 2019
Entry:Free

2. Katsushika Fireworks Festival (July 24th, Shibamata Station)

Now on its 52nd year, this event, also known as the Katsushika Noryo Hanabi, will take place from 7:20-8:20 pm at the Shibamata Baseball Field, about 10 minutes away from Shibamata Station. While it takes place on a weekday night this year, it sill manages to attract quite a crowd, what with its 13,000 fireworks lighting up the sky.

 Katsushika Fireworks Festival

Dates:Late Jul, 2019
Entry:Free
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Photo by Takayuki Suzuki used under CC

3. Edogawa Fireworks Festival (August 4th, Koiwa or Shinozaki Station)

Another one of Tokyo’s older fireworks festivals, the Edogawa Fireworks Festival turns 43 this year. It’s a bit of a walk from either Koiwa Station (25 minutes) or Shinozaki Station (15 minutes) to the venue: the Edogawa riverbank. (Fun fact: from the other side of the river, the one in Chiba Prefecture, is called the Ichikawa City Noryo Fireworks Festival.) About 14,000 fireworks will go off, set to music and grouped according to themes such as Summer Splash and Yellow Rush. This festival takes place from 7:15 pm-8:30 pm. In case of rain, the event will be postponed to the next day.

 Edogawa Fireworks Festival

Dates:Early Aug, 2019
Entry:Free

4. Itabashi Fireworks Festival (August 4th, Nishidai, Takashimadaira, or Ukima-Funado Station)

The Itabashi Fireworks Festival is notably longer than the aforementioned events at 1 hour and 30 minutes, from 7:00 pm-8:30 pm. The event area, the south banks of the Itabashi River, is a long walk from these stations (30 minutes, regardless of which you pick). The organizers caution that Ukima-Funado tends to be the most crowded station, and that Takashimadaira is the most convenient. If you don’t want to walk all the way to the event area, you can take a 15-minute bus ride from Narimasu or Tobu-Nerima Stations.

The festival promises 12,000 fireworks, and there’ll even be a photo contest, so make sure to get your best shot of the fireworks! The event is free, but paid reserved seating options are also available.

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 Itabashi Fireworks Festival

tokyo fireworks
Dates:Early Aug, 2019
Entry:Free

5. Tamagawa Fireworks Festival (October 13th, Futakotamagawa Station)

Another of the popular ones, the Tamagawa Fireworks Festival, has been moved to October after the washout of 2017. Now on its 40th year, will be held from 6:00 pm-7:00 pm around the Futakotamagawa area, just above the Tama River. It gets crowded extremely quickly, so stake out a location as early as possible (or you can pay for a reserved seat here if you’ve got the funds). The fireworks will be set off in synchronicity with music, and there will be a photo contest as well. Note the event will be canceled in case of bad weather with no postponement date.

 Tamagawa Fireworks Festival

tokyo fireworks
Dates:Mid Oct, 2019
Entry:Free

6. Tokyo Bay Fireworks Festival (On hold until after the 2020 Olympics)

tokyo fireworks
Photo by Zengame used under CC

Featuring 12,000 fireworks, this event is also one of Tokyo’s best-known fireworks festivals, however it’s been put on hold until after the 2020 Olympics due to development in the area.

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If smaller scale events are what you prefer, check out these Tokyo fireworks festivals

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Photo by ajari used under CC

6. Hachioji Fireworks Festival (July 28th, Nishi-Hachioji Station)

Update: Due to a typhoon, the Hachioji Fireworks Festival has been canceled with no postponement date announced.

This event is a small one with 3,500 fireworks brightening the Hachioji Shimin Kyujo Ballpark of Fujimori Park, 15 minutes away from Nishi-Hachioji Station, from 7:00 pm-8:30 pm.

 Hachioji Fireworks Festival

tokyo fireworks
Dates:Late Jul, 2019
Entry:Free

8. Showa Kinen Park Fireworks Festival (July 28th, Tachikawa Station)

Update: Due to a typhoon, the Showa Kinen Fireworks Festival has been canceled with no postponement date.

Taking place at the spacious, beautiful Showa Kinen Park/Showa Memorial Park, this small-scale event takes place from 7:20-8:20 pm, and will feature 5,000 fireworks. While entrance to the park is free from 6:00 pm, entering the park before then will require paying for entrance, but is recommended if you want to stake out a better spot. The organizers estimate that crowds will start to gather at 5:00 pm, so try to arrive earlier than that—you could even stroll around the park if you arrive early enough! The park is great for a picnic, so why not try to enjoy a dinner accompanied by fireworks?

 Showa Kinen Park Fireworks Festival

Dates:Late Jul, 2019
Entry:Free

9. Koto Fireworks Festival (August 1st, Minami-Sunamachi Station)

From 7:30 pm-8:30 pm, prepare to see about 4,000 fireworks at Sunamachi Mizube Park near the Arakawa River, a 15-minute walk from Minami-Sunamachi Station. Although the event is small in scale, expect a crowd of about 35,000 to show up. Fireworks will be canceled in case of a typhoon to the following day (of the one following that) although generally it is held rain or shine.

 Koto Fireworks Festival

tokyo fireworks
Dates:Early Aug, 2019
Entry:Free
tokyo summer events
Photo by Zengame used under CC

10. Ome City 70th Noryo Fireworks Festival (August 4th, Ome Station)

This festival will be held at Nagayama Park, a 10-minute walk from JR Ome Station, from 7:30-8:50 pm, and will feature exactly 4,001 fireworks.



 Ome City Nohryo Fireworks Festival

tokyo fireworks
Dates:Early Aug, 2019
Entry:Free

11. Jingugaien Fireworks Festival (August 11th, Sendagaya or Yoyogi Station)

With 12,000 fireworks, this event held at Jingu Stadium will set off the fireworks from 7:30-8:30pm, but there will also be performances from various artists. Although a ticket is required to view the event from the stadium, you can still see the fireworks for free if you’re around the area. Gaienmae and Aoyama-itchome Station are also close to the venue. The event will take place the next day in case of bad weather.

 Jingugaien Fireworks Festival

jingugaien fireworks
Dates:Mid Aug, 2019
Entry:Free

12. Chofu City Fireworks Festival (October 27th, Keio-Tamagawa Station)

So, not a summer festival as it’s taking place in October—however, it’s a good chance to experience a summer festival atmosphere if you’re visiting in the fall. Like the larger Tamagawa Fireworks Festival, this event, which is on its 62nd year, will light up the Tama River with 10,000 fireworks from 5:30-6:50 pm.

 Chofu City Fireworks Festival

tokyo fireworks
Dates:Late Oct, 2019
Entry:Free

For more options, try these firework festivals in Yokohama.

This post is updated annually. Last update: June 2018.

Written by:
Filed under: Events, Holidays, Things to do
Tags: Featured-asakusa, Fireworks, Hanabi, Outdoors, Parks, Picnic, Summer, Summer Festivals
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10 Responses to “The Tokyo Summer Fireworks Guide”

  1. Actually, because the Japanese word for fireworks is “hanabi”…it’s still got the hana. Even the same kanji is used…so “just like hanami…but hanaBI…” or something cheesy along those lines. I know that my little suburb outside of Tokyo is doing it’s own hanabi festivities around 7:30pm the same day, so I will probably content myself to watch that and deal with whatever crowds surface…hopefully being slightly more off the urban path will spare me from wanting to do the windmill (you know, swinging my arms wildly to clear space)…

    • Mine Serizawa
      Mine Serizawa July 26, 2012

      yes! you are so right. i should probably abstain from any kanji-related humor in the future. my place is out in the boondocks but we catch several smaller fireworks displays straight from our balcony…no cost, no crowds, no windmills

      • Nah, I wouldn’t say to avoid Kanji related humor! The real issue with it would be that many English readers might not know very much kanji? But if you explain the meaning it could actually help people with their proficiency. I don’t know a lot of kanji myself, but the more i use it and see it the more I recognize, so dropping a little bit of it into a largely English based article (with proper translation) could help my literacy while providing a small insight into the culture. 😀

  2. Jessica Robins-eads July 25, 2012

    Actually, because the Japanese word for fireworks is “hanabi”…it’s still got the hana. Even the same kanji is used…so “just like hanami…but hanaBI…” or something cheesy along those lines. I know that my little suburb outside of Tokyo is doing it’s own hanabi festivities around 7:30pm the same day, so I will probably content myself to watch that and deal with whatever crowds surface…hopefully being slightly more off the urban path will spare me from wanting to do the windmill (you know, swinging my arms wildly to clear space)…

    • Mine Serizawa
      Mine Serizawa July 26, 2012

      yes! you are so right. i should probably abstain from any kanji-related humor in the future. my place is out in the boondocks but we catch several smaller fireworks displays straight from our balcony…no cost, no crowds, no windmills

      • Jessica Robins-eads August 23, 2012

        Nah, I wouldn’t say to avoid Kanji related humor! The real issue with it would be that many English readers might not know very much kanji? But if you explain the meaning it could actually help people with their proficiency. I don’t know a lot of kanji myself, but the more i use it and see it the more I recognize, so dropping a little bit of it into a largely English based article (with proper translation) could help my literacy while providing a small insight into the culture. 😀

  3. Me and my boyfriend will be visiting tokyo just in time for the festival and wanted to go and watch. This might be a silly question… but We’ll be coming from Kichijoji in the afternoon, is it possible to watch from there? Or should I really head to Asakusa?

    • CheapoGreg April 19, 2015

      Hi there, You will absolutely NOT be able to see the Sumidagawa Fireworks from Kichijoji! 🙂 Asakusa might be a bit challenging too – but only because the event attracts over a million spectators and that will be one of the busiest stations/areas.
      Check our events listing closer to the time. I’m certain there will be large fireworks festivals on to the west of Kichijoji as well. Of course the Sumidagawa Fireworks are the biggest.


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